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U <X><10% * WORKBOOK A 

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JOB SELECTION WORKBOOK 

FOR USE WITH 



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UNITED STATES EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 
WASHINGTON. D.C. 



NAME 
DATE 



JOB SELECTION WORKBOOK 

This workbook has been prepared to help you get ready to find a job! 
Whether you have recently lost your job or are seeking your first job, 
the workbook should be of assistance. It will help you follow a step- 
by-step process to learn more about the world of work and how to choose 
an occupation or type of work that you would like to do and be able to 
do. Plan to spend about two to three hours using this workbook and the 
reference materials listed below to help you choose and get a suitable 
job. A few hours spent now in job exploration and planning might make 
a big difference in your future. 

People differ in what kind of work they can do and in what they 1 re 
interested in. You need to have three kinds of information to find a 
job that is right for you. 

First, you need information about yourself. You need to know the 
kind of work you would like to do. You need to know whether you are 
able to do such work. If you can't do it now, you need to know if you 
can learn to do it and if a training program is available. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402 



Second, you need information about jobs that sound interesting to you. 
You need to know what the worker does on the job. What knowledge and 
skills the worker must have. What training is needed. 

Third, you need to know if jobs are available in the occupations you 
are considering. 

This workbook will help you learn about occupations which match your 
interests and abilities. It will also help you develop a plan of action 
to secure training or employment. It is organized into the following 
six steps: 

Step 1. Think about your interests. 

Step 2. Select one or more work groups to explore. 

Step 3. Explore the work groups you selected. 

Step k. Explore subgroups and specific occupations. 

Step 5. Get it all together. 

Step 6. Plan your next steps. 
This workbook will show you how to complete these steps. When you 
have completed them, you should have a much better idea of the type of 
work you want and can learn to do. In addition, you will be better 
prepared to seek employment, whether you do so through your State Job 
Service Office, a private employment agency, a school placement program, 
or by taking such independent action as answering want ads or applying 
directly to employers. 

To get the information you need in order to complete this workbook, 
you will have to do some reading in two different United States Employment 
Service publications. These are: 

1. The Guide for Occupational Exploration 

2. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles 

- 2 - 



The Dictionary of Occupational Titles includes the title and definition 
of almost all of the occupations which exist in the United States today. 
There are over 12,000 occupations defined in this Dictionary. All of these 
occupations (except those in the military) have been assigned to an interest 
area, a work group, and a subgroup, in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration. 

There are twelve interest areas, each of which has a title and a 
two-digit code. An example of an interest area is Artistic, which has 
the code of 01. 

There are 66 work groups, each of which has been given a title and a 
four-digit code. An example of a work group is Literary Arts, which is 
coded 01.01. 

Within each work group, occupations have been organized into sub- 
groups, each of which has been given a title and a six -digit code. An 
example of a subgroup is Creative Writing which is coded 01.01.02. 

The following is an example of all three of these - an area, a work 
group, and a subgroup - when they are put together. 



01 


Artistic 


(interest Ar 


01.01 


Literary Arts 


(Work Group) 


01.01.02 


Creative Writing 


(Subgroup) 



You will notice that in the six -digit code for a subgroup, the first 
two digits represent the interest area, the first four indicate the 
work group, and all six digits represent the subgroup. 



3 - 



If you will look on page 17 of the Guide, you find that the following 
occupations are listed under the subgroup title and code of 01.01.02: 

Biographer (profess. & kin.) 052. 067-010 
Copy Writer (profess. & kin.) 131.067-OlU 
Humorist (profess. & kin.) 131.067-026 
Lyricist (profess. & kin.) 131.067-03U 
Poet (profess. & kin.) 131.067-OU2 
Writer, Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction (profess. 
& kin.) 131.067-9^6 

Continuity Writer (radio & tv broad.) 131.0&7-010 
These jobs are listed with their title and Dictionary code, so that 
you may look up their definitions in the Dictionary. 

It should not be difficult for you to follow the instructions in 
this workbook step-by-step. As you do this, you will learn about many 
jobs, including some that you never knew existed. You will end up with 
a better understanding of the kinds of work you can do and find satis- 
faction doing. This Job Selection Workbook will be yours to keep. It 
may be of interest to those you contact as you seek employment. 

STEP 1. Think About Your Interests 

What kind of work would you most like to do? Some workers are 
interested in helping others. Some would rather work with their hands 
or tools or machines. Others prefer artistic work, or selling, or 
writing, or clerical work. These are just a few examples. 

In order to learn more about the relation of your interests to 
occupations, turn to Figure 1 on the following page and read the titles 
and definitions of each interest area. In the blank form on page 7 
write the two-digit number and the title of each area which you think 
you might be interested in exploring. Complete this activity before you 
read further in this workbook. 

r k - 



DEFINITIONS OF INTERESTS 

01 Artistic 

Interest in creative expression of feelings or ideas. 

02 Scientific 

Interest in discovering, collecting, and analyzing information about the 
natural world and in applying scientific research findings to problems 
in medicine, life sciences, and natural sciences. 

03 Plants and Animals 

Interest in activities involving plants and animals, usually in an outdoor 
setting. 

Ok Protective 

Interest in using authority to protect people and property. 

05 Mechanical 

Interest in applying mechanical principles to practical situations, 
using machines, hand tools, or instruments. 

06 Industrial 

Interest in repetitive, concrete, organized activities in a factory 
setting. 

07 Business Detail 

Interest in organized, clearly defined activities requiring accuracy 
and attention to details, primarily in an office setting. 

08 Selling 

Interest in bringing others to a point of view through personal 
persuasion, using sales and promotion techniques. 

09 Accommodating 

Interest in catering to and serving the desires of others, usually 
on a one-to-one basis. 

10 Humanitarian 

Interest in helping individuals with their mental, spiritual, social, 
physical or vocational concerns. 

11 Leading -Influencing 

General interest in leading and influencing others through activities 
involving high level verbal or numerical abilities. 

12 Physical Performing 

Interest in physical activities performed before an audience. 

Figure - 1 



- 5 - 



If you have a particular occupation in mind, you can find the interest 
area to which it belongs by looking it up in the alphabetical index which 
begins on page 336 of the Guide. Following the job title in the index, you 
will find two code numbers. The second code number will have six digits, 
separated by periods into three sets of two. 

The first two digits of this group are the code number of the interest 
area to which the job belongs. Include this code number and the title of 
this area in the list you plan to explore. (Example: The six -digit group 
for machinist is 05.05.07. The first two digits, 05, indicate that this 
job is located in interest area 05 Mechanical. Thus, if you are interested 
in machinist or other mechanical types of work you would list this area as 
one you want to explore.) 

If you would like to know more about any of the 12 interest areas, you 
may look up a more detailed description of the area. The page numbers 
for those descriptions are shown in dark type in the Contents in the 
front of the Guide on pages v and vi. 



- 6 - 



AREAS RELATED TO MY STRONGEST INTEREST 



Code Number Title 



Not all occupations in the areas you have selected will be of interest 
to you. Many of them may require knowledge and skills that you do not have 
or would have difficulty acquiring. There should be occupations in each of 
these areas, however, which fit your interests and which you can do or 
learn to do. To help you locate these jobs, each of the interest areas 
has been divided into groups of jobs which have similar worker requirements, 
These are called Work Groups. In the next step you will learn about the 
work groups which belong to the interest areas you selected. You will 
then select one or more of these work groups for further exploration. As 
you read each work group description, you need to think about whether you 
are really interested in this type of work and whether you can do or 
learn to do the work involved. 

- 7 - 



STEP 2. Select One or More Work Groups to Explore 

Some work groups axe made up of jobs which require little special 
training or experience. Jobs in these groups are open to nearly anyone 
who is willing to work. Other groups include jobs which require special 
courses in school or special training or education after high school. 

For example, some jobs require knowledge of subjects such as physics 
or chemistry. Others require accuracy and speed in working difficult 
math problems. You need to think about what courses you have taken in 
school, how well you did in those subjects, and whether or not you might 
like a job which uses such knowledge and skills. You also need to think 
about whether you might be able to get needed additional training. If 
work groups or jobs you are considering require work experience in a lower 
level job, you need to determine if you have such experience or are willing 
and able to get it. 

The work groups in each interest area are generally arranged in order, 
with the groups that require the most education, training, and experience 
listed first. Figure 2 on the following page illustrates this by listing 
the work groups in Area 05, Mechanical. As the figure shows, the first 
group in 05 is 05.01, Engineering. Most jobs in this group require four 
or more years of college or technical training. The last work group in 
this area is 05.12, Elemental Work: Mechanical. Many jobs in this group 
are open to workers who have little formal education. The work groups 
between 05.01 and 05.12 are arranged as nearly as possible to place the 
groups requiring the most education and experience ahead of those which 
require less knowledge, skill, or training. As you make your selection 
of work groups to explore, you need to think about the difficulty of the 
work involved in each group, and about the training and experience that 

are required. 

^ 8 - 



WORK GROUPS IN AREA 05, MECHANICAL 

05.01 Engineering 

05.02 Managerial Work: Mechanical 

05.03 Engineering Technology 

05. OU Air and Water Vehicle Operation 

05.05 Craft Technology 

05.06 Systems Operation 

05.07 Quality Control 

05.08 Land and Water Vehicle Operation 

05.09 Materials Control 

05.10 Crafts 

05.11 Equipment Operation 

05.12 Elemental Work: Mechanical 



- ' Figure d. 

In order to select the work groups you want to explore farther, you 
need to determine if you would find satisfaction in work activities such 
as those required by occupations in the group. To do this, turn to the 
Contents of the Guide, page v and vi, and find the page numbers for the 
work groups in the first interest area you selected in Step 1. Turn to 
the pages of other work groups you want to know more about and read the 
descriptions of those groups. Think about what you like to do and what 
you think you can do. Select those work groups which interest you and 
which involve work you think you can do. 

In the blank form on the page following this one, write the code 
number of the interest area and the code and title of each work group 
you want to explore further. If you aren't certain about a particular 
group, you can include it in your list until you learn more about it in 
Step 3. 

When you have made your selection of work groups from the first 
interest area you selected in Step 1, follow this same process for any 
other interest areas you selected in Step 1. 



t 9 



WORK GROUPS I WANT TO EXPLORE FURTHER 
Area Number Code Number Title 



You are now ready to explore each of the work groups you think includes 
jobs you would like and could learn to do. 

STEP 3. Explore the Work Groups Ydu Selected 

On pages 13 and 15, you will find a copy of Part 1 of a Work Group 
Exploration Sheet which you should follow and complete as you explore the 
first work group you have selected. Five additional copies of the 
Exploration Sheet will be found at the end of this workbook. Use those 
sheets for the additional work groups you wish to explore. If you want 
to explore more than six groups, you can follow the outline used in the 
exploration sheet and keep your notes on separate sheets of paper. 

To explore a work group, look up its description again in the 

Guide for Occupational Exploration , and study the questions and answers 

below it. They will provide the information you need to complete 

Part 1 of the Work Group Exploration Sheet. 

- 10 - 



You will notice that the questions under the work group description 
are the same as those listed on the Work Group Exploration Sheets you are 
using. As you read about a group, you may discover that you are not 
interested in it, or you may find that the training requirements are more 
difficult than you want. If you find that you no longer want to consider 
the group, stop exploring it and do not complete an exploration sheet for 
it. You may also want to cross it off the list of the work groups you 
made out in Step 2. If your interest in the group continues, fill in 
Part 1 of the exploration sheet as completely as possible and then go on 
to Step U and explore the subgroups in this group. Do the same for each 
work group you have decided to explore. 



- 11 



WORK GROUP EXPLORATION SHEET 
Group No: Title: 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any work group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of work would you do? (The work group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Note 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



■13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1. 
Page 2 



How do you know if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
work? (Which of these clues seem to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Bote the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would you have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



■15- 



PART 2: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP U 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO. 



(All of the jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



-17- 



STEP U. Explore Subgroups and Specific Occupations 

After you have decided that you are interested in a work group and 
have filled in Part 1 of the Work Group Exploration Sheet (Step 3) > you 
should examine its subgroups to see if one or more of them appears to 
suit your interests and qualifications better than the others. If you 
need further information to help you decide, you should pick out one or 
more of the occupations in the subgroup and look them up in the 
Dictionary of Occupational Titles . You can do this by using the nine- 
digit DOT code, which is shown in the subgroups immediately following 
the title of each occupation. For example, the DOT code for Copy Writer 
is 131.067-010 and is located in subgroup 01.01.02 (see page 17 of the 
Guide . ) 

Job definitions in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles are listed 
in numerical order by DOT code. Thus, to look up Copy Writer, you would 
look in the DOT under code 131.067-010, which is on page 77. 

As you work through Step U, for any work group, keep a record of any 
subgroups or specific occupations which are of particular interest to 
you. Use Part 2 of the Work Group Exploration Sheet to record this 
information. 

Complete the subgroups (Part 2) for each work group (Part 1), before 
going on to the subgroups for the next work group which interests you. When you 
finish with Part 2 for the first work group on page lk 9 fill in the Part 2 
work sheets in the back of this workbook for all the other work groups for 
which you completed Work Group Exploration Sheets. 



■19- 



When you have completed your exploration of all groups which interest 
you, and have identified subgroups, and possibly occupations, of particular 
interest, you are in a position to organize the information you have gathered. 
You can then make some decisions and plan your next steps. Step 5 will help 
you do this. 

STEP 5. Get It All Together 

As you make your vocational plans, it is not usually a good idea to 
narrow your preferences to one occupation. Although you can hold only one 
job at a time, you should have alternative choices ready in case you cannot 
complete preparation, cannot find employment, or find that you have lost 
interest in your preferred occupation as you have learned more about your- 
self and about the work involved. 

As you complete your exploration of work groups and subgroups, make sure 
that you have a record of those which you want to continue to consider until 
you find satisfactory employment. Such a record should list all subgroups 
you are still considering, starting with the one for which you have the 
greatest interest and ending with the one which seems least important to 
you. The table on page 23 should serve this purpose. If you have identified 
one or more specific occupations in which you are interested and for which 
you feel at least partially qualified, they should be included in your list 
and identified by subgroup number. 

Review what you have written on each work group exploration sheet. 
From these sheets, you should be able to identify subgroups and specific 
occupations that are of interest to you. They should be listed in the 
following table, in order of interest to you . If you are interested in 



■20- 



the type of work covered by a subgroup but are not sure vhich occupations 
within the group you prefer, list the subgroup only, showing subgroup, 
number and title. If you are interested in one or more specific occupations 
in a subgroup, list the subgroup number and title and the DOT occupational 
title. More than one occupation in the same work group may be listed. 



-21- 



OCCUPATIONS OR SUBGROUPS WHERE I PREFER TO FIND EMPLOYMENT 
My Qualification Status 



Strongest £ 
Interest I 

1 




sgroup 
iiber 


Subgroup 
Title 


Title of 
Occupation 


Qualified 

n 

n 

LJ 

n 
n 
o 
n 

LJ 
LJ 
LJ 


Have 
Most 
Skills 

LJ 

LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
Tj 


Have 
Some 
Skills 

LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 
LJ 


Need 
Training 

or 
Experience 

n 


2 












n 


3 








n 


4 








n 


5 








n 


6 








n 


7 








n 


8 








n 


9 








n 


Least 10 








n 


Interest 













Use the information in your Work Group Exploration Sheets and in the 
work group descriptions to compare your present qualifications with those 
needed in the subgroups or occupations you are considering. You may have 
the training and experience needed for immediate employment. On the other 
hand, you may have to make plans which include additional training, or 
securing work experience at a lower level to help qualify you for the work 
of your choice. In the section headed My Qualification Status in the table 
above, check the boxes which you think describe your readiness to take a 
job in each of the subgroups or occupations you have listed. 



-23- 



STEP 6. Plan Your Next Steps 

When you have completed the first five steps you are ready to 
determine your own personal plan of action. Hot/ you plan your next steps 
will depend on how you analyze your present sit* it ion. Read all of the 
following statements and check the one which best describes how you feel 
about yourself right now. 

1. My need for employment is urgent. I must start earning money 

as soon as possible. 
2. I need additional training for employment. 

a. I can get the financial help I need in order to take the 

necessary training. 

b. I would need some help. 

c. I would need much help. 

3. I would prefer to get a job and also enter a training program. 

k. I need to explore further before I make up my mind. 

5. I don't know what I need. I would like help from a counselor. 



Plan your next steps according to what you have checked above. If 
your next step is employment (number 1, above), you need to make some 
job -hunting plans. The chart on page 23 will help you identify the type 
of job opening you are seeking and should give you clues concerning 
possible employers. Your State Job Service office, your school counselor, 
or your library should be able to help you find a how-to-do-it-book on job 
hunting which willMielp you develop a resume of your qualifications and 
give you other suggestions. Your State Job Service office may have 
brochures or other materials available for your use, and can assist you 
in finding employment. In addition, you may seek employment on your own 
by answering want ads or applying directly to employers. 



-25- 



However you go about it, take this workbook with you. It will help a State 
Job Service counselor or interviewer, rehabilitation or other counselor or 
potential employer to learn about your interests and abilities. It should 
also help convince those who see it that you are making a real effort to 
locate a job you are qualified to do or learn. 

If your next step is training (number 2 above), your State Job Service, 
your library, or your school counselor should be able to help you locate 
information about available training programs. If you apply personally for 
admission to any training program, you may want to show this workbook to the 
admissions counselor so that he or she may better help you plan an appropri- 
ate course. 

If you hope to combine employment and training (number 3 above), you can 
proceed by either or both of the following approaches. You can first seek 
employment and then look for a part-time training program which will fit 
into your work schedule. Or you can apply for admission to a training 
program, in a school or agency which will help you find part-time work. 
Some training agencies provide part-time paid employment as part of their 
program. Again, your State Job Service agency, your library or your school 
counselor can help you learn more about combined work and training 
opportunities. 

If you feel the need for further exploration before you make up your 
mind (number k above), you can proceed by either or both of the following 
approaches. You can repeat the steps outlined in this workbook and explore 
work groups you passed up the first time through. Or you can contact a 
counselor in your State Job Service agency or other agency which provides 
vocational guidance services, as suggested in more detail in the next 
paragraph. 

-26- 



If you don't know what you should do (number 5 above) , you can probably 
be helped by f vocational counselor or by enrolling in a course or program 
which has been designed to help people who want assistance in vocational 
planning. If you are a student, you should arrange to meet with your school 
counselor, who can help you personally or tell you about any special programs 
available. If you are already in contact with a specialized agency such as 
the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation or a half-way house , the counselor 
or case worker in that program should be able to help you or to refer you 
to someone who can. If you are completely on your own, you should try to 
locate a private or public organization that offers vocational guidance 
services. Your library can probably help you identify such organizations. 
One agency, as stated earlier, which should be able to provide you both 
employment counseling and job placement service is the local office of the 
State Job Service. 

It will help you get the best results from all the studying and thinking 
you have just done if you make a step-by-step outline of the things you 
think you should do next. Use the Plan of Action Sheet at the end of this 
section to make a record of the next steps you plan. Your next steps will, 
of course, depend on how you analyze your present situation and which of 
the items on page 25 you cheeked. Write your ideas in the order in which 
you think you should act on them so that you can use your list as a check- 
list to see how you are progressing. For example, if you checked item 1, 
you will need to plan the best way to get a job. You may start by 
reading a book on job-hunting from your school or local library. Next 
you may want to prepare a personal resume' showing your training, 



-27- 



experience, and other qualifications. If you haven't already done so, you 
should register at the local office of your State Job Service. These are 
just a few samples of things you might write into your plan of action. In 
addition to a primary plan of action, you might also want to work out an 
alternate plan for use in case the first one doesn't work out rapidly enough— 
or you find some problems with it. 

whatever step you take, be sure that you plan to make use of the things 
you have learned as you completed this workbook. You will probably want to 
share the workbook with people you contact, whether for employment, admission 
to training, or vocational counseling. 



-28- 



PLAN OF ACTION 



Action Planned 


Date Taken 


Results 


1. 






2. 






3. 






h. 







USE ADDITIONAL SHEETS IF NECESSARY 
INSTRUCTIONS: In the left column, list all the steps you plan to take to 
reach your objective of selecting an occupation, preparing for it, and/or 
seeking employment. If your plans include training they may require a year 
or more to complete. Write your plans in pencil because you may want to 
change later steps as a result of what you accomplish in the earlier ones. 
In the second column show the date you took the planned action and in 
the third column the results from that action. You may want show further 
plans in the first column if the results proved unsuccessful and continue to 
do so until you meet with success. 

-29- 



WORK GROUP EXPLORATION SHEET 



Group No: Title: 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any work group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of work would you do? (The work group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Note 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



■13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1. 
Page 2 



3. How do you know if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
work? (Which of these clues seem to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Note the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would you have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



-15- 



PART 2: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP U 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO. 



(All of the jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



■17- 



WORK GROUP EXPLORATIOH SHEET 
Group Mo: Title: 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any work group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of work would you do? (The work group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Mote 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



■13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1, 
Page 2 



3. How do you knov if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
vork? (Which of these clues seen to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



If, How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Note the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would you have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



5. What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



-15- 



PART 2: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 4 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO. 



(All of the Jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



-17- 



WORK GROUP EXPLORATIOH SHEET 



Group Bo: Title j 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any vork group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of vork vould you do? (The vork group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Note 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



2. What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



■13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1, 
Page 2 



Bow do you know if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
work? (Which of these clues seem to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Bote the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would you have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



5. What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



-15- 



PART 2: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP k 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO. 



(All of the jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



-17- 



WORK GROUP EXPLORATIOH SHEET 
Group Mo: Title: 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any work group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of work would you do? (The work group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Note 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



■13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1, 
Page 2 



How do you know if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
work? (Which of these clues seem to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Note the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would yoa have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



-15- 



PART 2: TO BE CX)MPLETED AS PART OF STEP U 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO, 



(All of the jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



-17- 



WORK (SOUP EXPLORATION SHEET 
Group Mo: Title: 



PART 1: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP 3. 



The information about each work group in the Guide for Occupational 
Exploration is organized in the form of answers to five basic questions. 
When you explore any work group, first read the information it gives in 
answer to question 1. Then complete the blank for that question on this 
sheet. Continue with each of the other four questions in the same manner, 
You may drop the group at any time you decide it is not for you. 

1. What kind of work would you do? (The work group answer describes 
tasks performed by workers on different jobs in this group. Note 
here those which appear most interesting to you and which you think 
you could learn to do.) 



What skills and abilities do you need for this kind of work? (Compare 
the skills and abilities needed with the ones you have. List the 
skills needed and indicate after each the extent to which you have 
it, e.g., little or none, fair amount or great amount. If little 
or none, indicate if you are interested in developing them further 
through training or experience.) 



-13- 



Work Group Exploration Sheet, Part 1. 
Page 2 



3. Bow do you know if you would like or could learn to do this kind of 
work? (Which of these clues seem to fit you? Can you think of 
other experiences you have had which show your interest or your 
ability to do the work involved? Write your answers here.) 



How can you prepare for and enter this kind of work? (Bote the 
education, specific training, and experience requirements listed 
for jobs in this group. What additional training or experience 
would you need in order to qualify for this type of work? In the 
space below, list the things you would have to do to become 
qualified.) 



(Are you willing and able to secure the training and experience 
needed by workers in this group? What barriers, such as lack of 
time or money, or lack of interest in training, would you have to 
overcome? How do you feel about the possibility of preparing 
for this work? Write your answer here.) 



5. What else should you consider about these jobs? (in the space below, 
list anything else you need to consider about the group.) 



•15- 



PART 2: TO BE COMPLETED AS PART OF STEP k 
SUBGROUPS AND SPECIFIC JOBS TO CONSIDER IN GROUP NO. 



(All of the jobs in this work group are listed following the group 
description in the Guide for Occupational Exploration. Note that they 
are clustered into subgroups of similar jobs. Look at each subgroup. 
Note its title and the jobs it contains. List the subgroup number 
and title and the job title and code of the specific occupations which 
interest you most. Do not list specific occupations unless you have a 
particular interest in them and feel at least partially qualified.) 

Subgroup # Subgroup Title Occupational Title DOT Code 



-17- 

* U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1979 63] -624/2934 



3 0112 105183583